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Bar granted its live entertainment

CARY – Live indoor entertainment will continue at Coleman’s in the Park.

The Village Board on Tuesday voted to allow live entertainment and voted, 4-1, to remove a provision in the bar’s conditional-use permit that would have required it to stop live entertainment Thursday. The conditional-use permit was approved last year.

“During the last year, we have on several occasions used this privilege and to my knowledge, and [Village Administrator] Chris Clark has confirmed, we have had no complaints on our indoor music,” bar owner Brett Coleman wrote in a letter to the board.

Live indoor entertainment can take place from noon to midnight Sunday through Thursday, and from noon to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday.

Coleman said after the meeting that he has karaoke inside the bar at 645 Industrial Drive, and occasionally a live band.

“The Village Board has been good to us,” Coleman said. “We continue to work with them, and they’re working with us.”

Trustee Rick Dudek voted against removing the provision from the bar’s special-use permit. He said he would have supported a one-year permit extension.

“I didn’t want to take it out all together,” Dudek said. “The fact that residents in the neighborhood complain about activities and noise, I can’t turn a blind eye to that. I prefer to have them continue to be monitored for another year and see how it goes.”

Nearby residents Suzi and Chris Schoenhoft wrote an email to Village President Tom Kierna asking the village not to approve Coleman’s entertainment request.

“Although you and [a] police sergeant approved the volume of Coleman’s music, we continue to hear it from our yard,” the Schoenhofts wrote. “They have clearly altered the acceptable volume that was agreed upon.”

The Schoenhofts contend that Coleman’s plays music loudly until closing time.

“Most of the neighbors have decided not to attend this year’s meeting, primarily because it is painful to listen to the dishonesty by Coleman’s and the board’s lack of interest in the Cimarron residents’ well-being,” the Schoenhofts wrote.

According to a police report provided to the Village Board, police responded in November to the bar for a noise complaint.

The complainant said there was a large group of people being loud outside of the bar. When police arrived, there was only one person standing outside smoking a cigarette. The officer was unable to detect any kind of noise violation.

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