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Cary names Ed Fetzer interim police chief

Published: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 5:30 a.m. CDT

CARY – Deputy Police Chief Ed Fetzer will take over the department on an interim basis.

The Village Board on Tuesday appointed Fetzer as acting chief as the village looks for a replacement for Chief Steven Casstevens, who is leaving Friday to become the police chief in Buffalo Grove.

Fetzer has previously served as chief on an interim basis.

From early 2008 through the end of 2010, Fetzer was the acting chief after former chief Ron Delelio was placed on administrative leave as the result of a back injury.

Casstevens was named police chief in January 2011.

The process and timeline to find a permanent replacement for Casstevens will be discussed next week during the village’s police committee meeting, Village Administrator Chris Clark said.

Fetzer said on Tuesday it was too soon to say if he would apply for the permanent position.

Also Tuesday, the board approved hiring Municipal Code Corporation to codify the village’s ordinances, which was last done in 1981.

As part of the codification process, Municipal Code Corporation will make sure there are no ordinances that contradict each other and search for possible conflicts with state law, among other things.

The village in 2001 retained Book Publishing Company to revise and republish the code.

“This is a project that has been long overdue,” said Chris Stilling, director of Community and Economic Development.

Municipal Code Corporation will perform the project for $14,400.

Many communities in the state use Municipal Code, Stilling said.

“When we do research on various other communities, ... most of those communities are using Municipal Code ... and I find it very user-friendly,” Stilling said.

Codifying the village ordinances could take anywhere from seven to 10 months, according to village documents.

As part of the project, the village will be able to put its ordinances online.

The first year of having the village’s ordinances online would be free with subsequent years costing $400 to $550 a year, according to village documents.

Some of the village’s ordinances are online, such as its sign ordinance and other things that are referenced regularly, Stilling said.

Newly adopted ordinances have not been added to the code book, and the staff estimates about 700 ordinances have been approved since 2001.

However, there will be a lot of ordinances that will not be applicable to codification, such as the declaration of surplus property.

“We’re paying them to make that determination,” Stilling said.

The project is expected to produce a 900-page ordinance book.

In other action, the Village Board approved keeping Blue Cross/Blue Shield as its insurance provider for $721,000, which is a 12.86 percent increase from a year ago. Employee contributions cover a portion of that cost.

Under the plan that goes into effect July 1, employees would pay for 20 percent if they are part of PPO coverage and 13 percent if they are part of the village’s HMO coverage. The total cost to the village is about $707,350. The village budgeted about $716,000 for health insurance costs.

In order to help keep costs down, the village increased deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums for employees in the PPO plan, among other things.

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