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Marengo waste company looks for new site

City Council denies company's relocation because of zoning

Published: Friday, Dec. 20, 2013 4:57 p.m. CDT • Updated: Saturday, Dec. 21, 2013 10:42 p.m. CDT

MARENGO – A Marengo-based waste hauler for the past 40 years could move its increasingly busy operation out of the city, after the City Council recently nixed the company’s relocation plans.

MDC Environmental Services was looking to move its facility along Greenlee Street in Marengo to the western edge of town along Grant Highway. The waste management company has outgrown the Greenlee facility, said Scott Perian, the company’s business development director.

But aldermen concerned about zoning and future development along Marengo’s western main entrance rejected the potential move on a 5-3 vote during a meeting earlier this week.

“We obviously wanted to move, but we will continue to operate as we’ve always had,” Perian said. “They have their opinion, and that’s fine. We will work with their decision.”

MDC employees often park on side streets, and truck haulers have to pack into the facility, as the business has managed more waste in recent years, Perian said. The company serves Marengo, Huntley, Crystal Lake, Woodstock and seven other villages in the area.

Perian said the company will now look in and outside of Marengo for a larger site. He noted that Marengo doesn’t have a larger building ready for redevelopment.

MDC’s potential home would have been at 21906 W. Grant Highway, currently zoned for commercial business and adjacent to Wisted’s Supermarket. The local grocer filed a written protest to the move because of concerns over traffic and appearances a manufacturer would bring to the commercial area.

A majority of aldermen had similar issues with the proposal. Ward 2 Aldermen Matt Keenum and Carole Bartman; Ward 4 Aldermen Dennis Hammortree and Todd Hall; and Ward 1 Alderman Michael Smith all rejected the proposal on seven conditions.

Among the reasons, aldermen agreed the proposed rezone to manufacturing would have gone against the city’s comprehensive plan and would have created inconsistencies with other commercially-zoned businesses in the area.

“It flew in the face of our comprehensive plan,” Keenum said. “I saw no benefit to the city to disrupt the comprehensive plan for this particular plan.”

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