MCC career expo geared toward middle school, high school students

CRYSTAL LAKE – While inside the McHenry County College gym Wednesday, 12-year-old Hadley Giovacchini started making virtual cuts on the college’s anatomage table, which is an interactive dissection table.

“I thought it was pretty cool to see all the things that are inside of the body and what I might have to learn in the future,” said Hadley, who wants to be a doctor when she grows up.

Hadley, along with her 14-year-old brother, Brett, and their mother, Heather Giovacchini, came to the college’s Career Exploration Expo.

The event was geared toward middle school and early high school students to get them thinking about what career path they want to follow, and what types of classes they would need to take.

Brett said he wants to be a veterinarian. At the expo, he learned he would need to take lots of math and science.

Heather Giovacchini wanted her kids to see what career paths they might be interested in at the expo.

“It’s neat just for them to see all the different jobs out there,” Heather Giovacchini said.

At the event, there were tables on health and fitness education, criminal justice, digital media and graphics and engineering, among others, next to related businesses people can work for after studying certain subjects. The event also featured sessions on financial aid and dual credit programs.

The horticulture department, which has degrees or certificates in floral design and greenhouse management, among other things, was next to a handful of landscaping companies.

“[They] are showcasing what it is that you do for a job after you get the specific training,” said Kellie Carper, manager of New Student Transitions for MCC.

Organizers hoped to attract 300 to 400 people to the event.

“The point of this is to get the students to think beyond the one narrow path, and hopefully they’ll pick the right education path,” Carper said.

Barb Kreutzmann, of Cary, brought her son 13-year-old son, Jeremy, and 15-year-old daughter, Emma, to the expo.

Kreutzmann wanted Emma to start thinking about possible careers she can explore.

“She’s not sure what she wants to do,” Kreutzmann said.

Emma did get some good advice about how to make that eventual career choice.

“It’s good to figure out what you don’t like,” Emma Kreutzmann said. “I like to talk a lot, so I wouldn’t want to do a job where I have to be quiet, and I don’t like to sit for a long time, so I want to do a job where you’re moving all the time.”